New Study on Distracted Teen Driving Out

New Study on Distracted Teen Driving Out

WASHINGTON, D.C. (NBC) – There is an important message to get out as teens are heading back to school.
WASHINGTON, D.C. (NBC) – There is an important message to get out as teens are heading back to school. A new report from the Governor's Highway Safety Association looks at the problem of distracted teen drivers. The report highlights two dozen state programs that either examine tougher laws to fight this problem or note educational programs that help bring this message to young drivers and their parents.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for 15-20 year olds. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data confirm that teens and driving distractions do not mix. In 2012, 15-19 year olds accounted for the largest proportion (10 percent) of drivers who were distracted at the time of a fatal crash. Of those, more than half (57 percent) of the people killed were the teens themselves. Others killed were either passengers, pedestrians or bicyclists.

Some 78 percent of teens now own a cell phone. That's one type of distraction. But these inexperienced drivers are also distracted with grooming, adjusting the radio and by passengers in the car.

To read the full report, click the link in this article.

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