This video discusses who should get screened at what age, how screening helps prevent colorectal cancer and important information about screening test options.

Know the signs, but don’t wait to screen

Symptom List



Colorectal cancer (cancer in the colon or rectum) first develops with few, if any, symptoms. Be proactive and talk to your doctor. If symptoms are present, they may include:

A Change in Bowel Habits

Including diarrhea, constipation, a change in the consistency of your stool or finding your stools are narrower than usual

Persistent Abdominal Discomfort

Such as cramps, gas, or pain and/or feeling full, bloated or that your bowel does not empty completely

Rectal Bleeding

Finding blood (either bright red or very dark) in your stool

Weakness or Fatigue

Can also accompany losing weight for no known reason, nausea or vomiting

Colorectal cancer symptoms can also be associated with many other health conditions. Only a medical professional can determine the cause of your symptoms. Early signs of cancer often do not include pain. It is important not to wait before seeing a doctor. Early detection can save your life.

When to See a Doctor


The symptoms of colon cancer and rectal cancer can also be associated with many other health conditions. Only a medical professional can determine the cause of your symptoms.

Early signs of cancer often do not include pain. It is important not to wait before seeing a doctor. Early detection can save your life.

Remember, the most common symptom is NO symptom, which is why we call it the silent killer. If you’re 50, average risk, get screened! #tomorrowcantwait

Determine your risk — and practice prevention

Statistics and risk factors


Colorectal cancer (cancer that starts in the colon or rectum) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that 147,950 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 53,200 could die from this disease in 2020.

On average, the lifetime risk of developing colon cancer is about one in 23 for men and women combined (4.5%), however, this varies widely according to individual risk factors.

About 71% of cases arise in the colon and about 29% in the rectum.

Colorectal cancer survival rates


Since the mid-1980s, the colorectal cancer survival rate has been increasing, due in part to increased awareness and screening. By finding polyps and cancer in the earlier stages, it is easiest to treat. Improved treatment options have also contributed to a rise in survival rates.

Survival Rates

  • The five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer found at the local stage is 90%.
  • The five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer found at the regional stage is 71%.
  • The five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer found at the distant stage is 14%.

There are currently more than one million colorectal cancer survivors alive in the US.

Stage of diagnosis


According to the American Cancer Society:

  • 39% of colon and rectal cancer patients are diagnosed with localized-stage disease.
  • 35% of colon and rectal cancer patients are diagnosed with regional- stage disease.
  • 21% of colon and rectal cancer patients are diagnosed with distant-stage disease.

Colorectal cancer and age


  • The median age at diagnosis for colon cancer is 68 in men and 72 in women; for rectal cancer, it is 63 years of age in both men and women.
  • As a result of the rising colon and rectal cancer incidence rates in younger age groups coincident with declining rates in older age groups, the proportion of cases diagnosed in individuals younger than age 50 increased from 6% in 1990 to 11% in 2013.
  • Most of these cases (72%) occur in people who are in their 40s.