clear

Dogs Born With Innate Ability to Understand Human Cues, Study Suggests

Clear the Shelters

Help WETM-TV ‘Clear the Shelters!’ We hope you come out on Saturday, August 25 -Aug 29th, 2020, and adopt a furry friend!

Adoption fees are waived at participating shelters, during this time only, pending application approval. Other fees may still apply.

Here’s are participating adoption shelters in the Twin Tiers:

The Animal Care Sanctuary is a no-kill sanctuary with locations in East Smithfield and Wellsboro, Pennsylvania. Our mission is to provide a safe and caring refuge for companion animals, inspire change through education, provide adoption services, and support spay/neuter initiatives.

Questions about adoption? Contact the shelter:

Emily Shaffer, Adoption Coordinator
P: (570) 596-2200 x101
E: eshaffer@animalcaresanctuary.org

To be sure the process is smooth, please bring all veterinary records the day of Clear the Shelters, as most veterinarian offices are not open on weekends. Without veterinary records of current furry family members, we cannot complete a same-day adoption. Get ahead of the game and fill out an application a few days prior to arriving and we will work to get you preapproved.

More Clear the Shelters

While dogs can eventually learn to listen to their owners, some pups seem to be born with an innate ability to understand humans, research published Thursday in the journal Current Biology suggests.

At just 8 weeks old, some of the puppies in the study showed a startling willingness to lock eyes with humans they didn’t know and to take command cues, such as directions pointed out with a finger.

“From a young age dogs are displaying humanlike social skills,” said the lead study author, Emily Bray, a postdoctoral researcher the Canine Cognition Center at the University of Arizona in Tucson and a researcher at Canine Companions in Santa Rosa, California. “Puppies, even before they have a lot of experience with people, can reciprocate [the] human gaze and can use information from humans in a social context, like pointing as a cue to find hidden food.”

To determine whether the tendency to interact with humans was innate, Bray and her colleagues ran several experiments with 375 8-week-old puppies who had little previous one-on-one experience with humans. The puppies were all Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers or a mix of the two breeds. All of the puppies in the study were bred to be service dogs.

Read the full story at NBCNews.com.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Now