Irma Leaves Millions Without Power in Florida and Moves North

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Hurricane Irma weakened to a Category 1 storm early Monday as it headed north over Florida, where it twice made landfall and plunged millions of people into darkness.

No deaths were confirmed Sunday, but the extent of the damage after a day of triple-digit winds and raging waters couldn’t fully be assessed until daybreak. Florida’s largest utility reported that the storm had knocked out power nearly three-quarters of its customers.

By 5 a.m. ET Monday, Irma had sustained winds of 75 mph as it moved further inland, about 60 miles north of Tampa.

 
 

TAMPA, Fla. — Hurricane Irma weakened to a Category 1 storm early Monday as it headed north over Florida, where it twice made landfall and plunged millions of people into darkness.

No deaths were confirmed Sunday, but the extent of the damage after a day of triple-digit winds and raging waters couldn’t fully be assessed until daybreak. Florida’s largest utility reported that the storm had knocked out power nearly three-quarters of its customers.

By 5 a.m. ET Monday, Irma had sustained winds of 75 mph as it moved further inland, about 60 miles north of Tampa.

 

Tampa appeared to be largely unscathed after Irma passed thorough. Some trees, power lines and signs were down but there was no widespread damage and no signs of flooding downtown early Monday. However, a storm surge warning remained in effect for some areas — including Tampa Bay.

Hurricane-force winds were extending outward up to 60 miles from Irma’s center, and tropical-storm-force winds were being felt up to 415 miles away, the National Hurricane Center added.

Around 4.9 million homes and businesses across Florida were without electricity . That figure included than 3.6 million Florida Power & Light customers. The company has around 4.9 million customers — covering an estimated 10 million people across the state.


The Latest on the Storm

  • Irma hit the lower Florida Keys with winds of up 130 mph just after 7 a.m. ET Sunday. It made landfall on Cudjoe Key around 2 hours later. It weakened to a Category 1 storm early Monday.
  • It passed the Tampa Bay area early Monday on its way to northern Florida.
  • The Florida Keys could get 10 to 20 inches of rain, and the western peninsula could get 10 to 15 inches. Tornado were also possible.
  • Tropical storm warnings are in effect hundreds of miles inland to north of Atlanta.

Many streets in Miami were submerged, and three construction cranes collapsed in Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

Forecasters urged Floridians not to let their guard down, warning of as much as 16 inches of rain and tropical storm-force winds well into Monday morning.

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