Keep WETM TV

Oswego City Schools calling on alumni, staff to preserve district history

News
Oswego-School-history_1559664632293.jpg_90679530_ver1.0_640_360_1559673079840.jpg

OSWEGO, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) — Keeping pieces of history intact is part of the Oswego City School District’s mission.

With his own long-running history with the district, Superintendent Dr. Dean Goewey is leading the effort to collect as many pieces of Oswego City Schools history as possible. 

Goewey’s father, Donald, was principal of Charles E. Riley Elementary School, the same school he also served as principal.

Goewey became superintendent in 2015 and although he’s marching forward with the district, he’s happily looking back to preserve history.

“I remember sitting at this table because of the side drawers,” Goewey said. “We found documentation in the ’30s. We actually have photos in some yearbooks of the school board sitting at this table.”

The table was spotted in a math office and it was then restored by a district worker, who also helped restore an antique clock from the late 1800s. The clock was a gift from the mayor’s office.

“I was fearful that maybe some other important things were being lost,” Goewey said. “Being a history buff myself, I just started digging in and trying to preserve and locate some things.”

Currently, a few display cases in the district office have paintings of well-known places in Oswego, but the staff is hoping to fill it with more historical pieces such as an old badminton racket holder found in what is now the Minetto Elementary School.

A yearbook collection, including the first ever edition from 1922, is coming together. With several years missing, Goewey found many more, thanks to alumni responding to social media posts, but he’s still hunting down editions from different decades. Years missing include 1923 to 1925, 1927, 1929, 1937, 1947, 1973, 1979, 1981 and 2017.

While there may not have been a yearbook published during the mid-1920s years, Goewey says he hopes “the rooted Oswego community could assist with locating missing yearbooks to complete the collection.”

As Goewey flips through old yearbooks, he said he wondered what they cost back then. For now, he’s  guessing they were, and are “priceless.”

If anyone in the community has a piece of OCSD history they would like to share with Dr. Goewey, or donate to the district, he said he would be happy to meet with them. He may be reached at (315) 341-2001.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.