(WHTM) – Fires are sadly common this time of year. With people cooking holiday meals or leaving heaters on too close to combustible materials.

So, when you come across a fire scene, where a fire hose is in the road, is it really a big deal if you slowly run over it?

According to the Pennsylvania Code:

3708.  Unauthorized driving over fire hose.

No vehicle shall be driven over any unprotected hose of a fire department when laid down on any highway, private road or driveway, for use at any fire or alarm of fire, without the consent of a fire department officer, a police officer or other appropriately attired person authorized to direct, control or regulate traffic at the scene.

Chapter 37, Section 3708 of the Pa. Code.

And according to NY law, it’s also illegal in the Empire State. The law says, “No vehicle shall be driven over any unprotected hose of a fire department when laid down on any street or private driveway, to be used at any fire or alarm of fire, without the consent of the fire department official in command.”

It is against Pennsylvania and New York law to run over any fire hose if you come across one during your travel.

Not only is it illegal, but it can also be extremely dangerous for many reasons. According to the Avondale Fire Company, there are many reasons why you should never attempt to drive over a fire hose.

  • It can cause the hose to burst, which would stop the water supply to firefighters who are fighting a blaze.
  • The hose can get caught by the car and be dragged down the road, injuring others in the process, and could cause damage to your car. Earlier this year, a firefighter was injured in Chambersburg after a car drove around traffic markers and ran over a hose
  • Fire engines and hydrants can be damaged and made unusable if hoses get torn off of them.
  • Fire hoses carry large amounts of water under immense pressure. If someone was near a hose and it busts, they can be seriously injured.

Driving over a hose also renders the hose unusable until the hose is tested.

The main thing to do if you see a hose in the roadway, even if it is flat with no water running through it, find an alternate route. If that is not possible, park your car away from the scene and ask a nearby police officer, fire police officer, or firefighter to help you navigate around the scene.

People who run over hoses face fines, and sometimes have to pay for a hose replacement if the hose is damaged beyond repair.

Also, driving over fire hoses may put the lives of people in jeopardy since that may be their only way to survive a fire.